How is potassium argon dating used

How is potassium argon dating used

Potassium (K) is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth's crust (2.4% by mass).

One out of every 10,000 Potassium atoms is radioactive Potassium-40 (K-40).

The potassium-argon (K-Ar) isotopic dating method is especially useful for determining the age of lavas.

Developed in the 1950s, it was important in developing plate tectonics and in calibrating the geologic time scale.

Although, organic materials as old as 100,000 years potentially can be dated with AMS, dates older than 60,000 years are still rare.

Paleoanthropologists and archaeologists must always be aware of possible radiocarbon sample contamination that could result in inaccurate dates.

This allows the dating of much older and smaller samples but at a far higher cost.

decay or the rate of other cumulative changes in atoms resulting from radioactivity. The various isotopes of the same element differ in terms of atomic mass but have the same atomic number..

One half-life is the amount of time required for of the original atoms in a sample to decay.

The abundance of Ar is unlikely to provide the age of intrusions of granite as the age typically reflects the time when a mineral cooled through its closure temperature.

However, in a metamorphic rock that has not exceeded its closure temperature the age likely dates the crystallization of the mineral.

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The calcium-potassium age method is seldom used, however, because of the great abundance of nonradiogenic calcium in minerals or rocks, which masks the presence of radiogenic calcium.

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